THE feature

SANTA ROSA, Calif.—Serving the legal cannabis industry may take North Bay CU from $50 million in assets to more than $500 million in the next five to 10 years.

CHICAGO–It’s a challenge common to most CUs: data is siloed in systems that don’t talk to each other. But there’s another challenge and it can be even bigger—data professionals are also siloed, and they aren’t part of two-way communication with the rest of the credit union—and that comes with a big cost for both the individuals and the CU itself, said three people here. 

LAKE FOREST, Ill.—Deposit rates are changing more quickly than at any time in history, reveals a new study whose author asserts credit unions need to become extremely savvy about deposit pricing or risk losing funds needed to support lending.

BOSTON—As lenders begin to use artificial intelligence as part of the underwriting process, concerns are arising about decisions AI might make that could negatively impact borrowers and lenders.

CHICAGO–The journey of the first female official in the National Football League has been a lot longer than 100 yards, and she wouldn’t have it any other way.

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.—Looking to hire someone who will have “analyst” in their job title? Get ready to pay–while potentially reducing salaries for other positions, one person is advising.

WASHINGTON–The man who oversees cybersecurity for the United States said he doesn’t want to be thought of as a person who frightens people, but he did just that in speaking to credit unions here, outlining cyber threats, especially from China, and calling on credit unions to sit down and hold a meeting as soon as possible.

I know what it’s like. I know what it’s like to be the little gal taking on Goliath.’  ­–Gretchen Carlson

WASHINGTON–Journalist Gretchen Carlson offered some frank details around the sexual harassment she and other women have experienced during their lives, and called on her credit union audience to make changes, show courage, and create a “chain of inspiration.”

LAKE FOREST, Ill.–All financial institutions—but especially credit unions–continue to provide inconsistent and often inaccurate information on their fees, rates and products both online and over the phone—and the problem is getting worse, according to a new study.