THE corner

GAINESVILLE, Fla.–If being a leader at work often feels like raising children, and if raising children often reminds you of work, there’s a reason–they have a lot in common and often require similar leadership skills, according to one person.

BOULDER, Colo.–Gary Agnes, president and CEO of Elevations Credit Union, was recently appointed to the Board of Overseers for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award by Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross.

CHICAGO–Have you reached a point of frustration with an employee who isn’t learning quickly enough. One expert is offering two steps you can take.

CHICAGO–How can you get consumers to so connect with your credit union that they actually care about your brand? One person is offering three strategies for doing just that.

GAINESVILLE, Fla.–Which is more powerful, words or actions? The two are interwoven, but many leaders struggle with the communication piece–especially in increasingly diverse workplaces. One person is offering some help.

AUSTIN, Texas – There are no silver bullets, culture is king, and it’s critical to stick with the long-term plan, according to one CEO who is retiring after overseeing a seven-fold increase in assets during his career.

LEWISTOWN, Mont.—After overseeing growth to $70 million from $4 million during a 35-year career, Bob Bjelland, CEO of Fergus FCU here, is retiring, and has shared his thoughts on lessons learned during his career in this CUToday.info Exit Interview. 

LAS VEGAS–After attending the Adobe Summit in Las Vegas, which focuses on the digital experiences brands are offering their customers, as well as other trends, Gene Hammett said he came away with three lessons that could be beneficial to all business owners and leaders. 

CHICAGO–Looking to fill an open position? There’s a good chance you’ll follow a standard process—a process that could use some improvement, according to one expert, including ditching that “animal” question.

CHICAGO–Growing pains occur anytime someone starts a new job, but just how long are managers supposed to wait for that new hire to find their groove? And what if they never find it?